How to Add a banner to a single page in WordPress?

This tutorial explains how to add a banner to a single page or set of pages in WordPress. This is particularly useful for those that have the desire to display a specific banner on a per page basis. For example, you might want one page to present a banner but do not want the banner to appear on your whole site. This can easily be accomplished in just a few steps, so let’s get started.

 

The Process:

1. First, access your site via ftp and get a copy of your page.php (the file is located in the /wp-content/themes/your-theme directory)

2. Open page.php using a text editor (I prefer Crimson Editor it’s free) and add the following code to the top of the file:

<?php
/*
Template Name: Page Two
*/
?>

3. Add your banner code to the very top of the file and then save the file as page2.php and upload it to your /wp-content/themes/your-themedirectory

4. Log into the WordPress admin panel and select Manage -> Pagesfrom the menu

5. From the list, select a page you would like to add the custom banner page to, then click edit

6. Under Advanced Options, you should see the Page Templatedropdown menu. Select Page Two from the menu and then click the save button.

Go view the page that you have just edited and you should see the new banner applied to that page. You can repeat this process multiple times to have different features available for specific pages

How to show different side bar for different pages and posts in WordPress?

How to add a second sidebar widget for use on separate pages or posts: The following tutorial covers the process of building a second widget compatible sidebar that can be used on specific pages or posts. Using a different WordPress sidebar for pages and posts allows the user to display different sidebar content on a given post or page. In addition, the user could add the duplicate sidebar widgets plugin to add the same widget content to both sidebars.

 

Adding a second widget compatible sidebar to WordPress:

This process assumes your using Kubrick or a theme based on Kubrick. Please backup any files before editing.

  1. Navigate to Design ->Theme Editor from your WordPress admin panel
  2. Open the functions.php file from the theme file list and find:

    if ( function_exists(‘register_sidebar’) )
    register_sidebar(array(
    ‘before_widget’ => ‘<li id=”%1$s”>’,
    ‘after_widget’ => ‘</li>’,
    ‘before_title’ => ‘<h2>’,
    ‘after_title’ => ‘</h2>’,
    ));

  3. Replace it with the following code, then update the file:

    if ( function_exists(‘register_sidebar’) )
    register_sidebar(array(‘name’=>’Sidebar 1’,));
    register_sidebar(array(‘name’=>’Sidebar 2’,));

    You should now have two widget compatible sidebars that show up under Design-> Widgets.
    Next we will add a Sidebar template to use for Sidebar 2 and then call it into the page or post we wish to have display the new sidebar.

  4. Download the sidebar2.zip file and upload the sidebar2.php within to your WordPress wp-content/themes/yourthemename/ directory
  5. Now to use Sidebar 2, simply replace the following code found in any of your template files. For example (Single Post) single.php

    <?php get_sidebar();  ?>

  6. With the following code:

    <?php include(“sidebar2.php”);  ?>

    Note: You can build a custom template that specifically calls in Sidebar 2 and elect to use it whenever you write a page that you wish to use this alternate Sidebar.

How to Show Sidebars in WordPress Posts and Pages?

In the following, I’ll explain the steps I took to add the sidebar to all posts and pages:

    1. The first step is to login to your administration panel.
    2. Click the Design tab from the admin navigation menu.
    3. Select the Theme Editor tab from the administration sub-menu.
    4. Now select the WordPress default theme within the theme editor window from the drop down menu under themes to edit.
    5. Find and select the single post theme file (single.php) from the WordPress default theme files to the right. You should now see Editing single.php at the top of the theme editor.
    6. Near the top of the file, find where it says:

      <div id="content">

    7. Change widecolumn to narrowcolumn so the code looks like the following:

      <div id="content">

    8. Now scroll down to the bottom of the file and find where it says:

      <?php get_footer(); ?>

    9. Directly above this add the following:

      <?php get_sidebar(); ?>

    10. Your final entry at the end of the single.php file should look like this:

      <?php get_sidebar(); ?>

      <?php get_footer(); ?>

    11. Once edited, simply click the update file button at the bottom right and go view your site. You should now have a sidebar on your post pages.

Note: You may also wish to remove the call to sidebar code from your 404.php error page. You can find it in the same way you found and edited the post.php.

What is MTM in Trading?

MTM Explained

1) MTM Definition

MTM (Mark-to-Market) is the value of a trade.  It is sometimes called the present value, meaning the value as of today.  There is also a concept of ‘future value’ meaning the value of a trade at a future point in time.

2) Present Value / Future Value formula

Future value answers questions like this… If you put $100 in the bank today at 5% interest, how much will you have in a year?  The answer is… you’ll have $105 which is your original $100 plus $5 interest.

Turning that around, you could ask, how much would need to put into the bank to get $105 in a year?  And the answer would be $100.    The $100 is the present value and the $105 is the future value.  Note that there is only 1 present value.  There are many future values, one for each day in the future.

If we want to know what is the present value of $100 for one year from now (instead of the $105 in the example above)… then we can calculate the ratio of the numbers above:

$100 / $105 = 0.9523809524

That ratio is a value between 0 and 1.00 and it is called the ‘discount factor’

so we can express the above as:

Present Value / Future Value = Discount Factor

and we can rearrange those terms as

Present Value = Future Value * Discount Factor

and use that formula and that ratio to calculate the present value of $100 one year from now (rounded to two decimal places):

$95.23 =  $100 * 0.9523809524

3) Compounded Interest

The above example assumes simple interest, which in this context just means one interest payment at the end of the year.  However, we could make the example more complicated by assuming two interest payments per year, i.e., one every 6 months.  This is sometimes called ‘compound interest’ because the interest from the first payment (after 6 months) is ‘compounded’ , meaning that the second payment (the one after 12 months) includes interest both on the original amount (which is sometimes called the ‘principal’ amount) and the interest from the first six months.

For example, if you start with $100 and earn interested of 5% compounded semi annually (every 6 months) you get this:

Time Now:  $100

Time 6 months:   $102.50

This is your original $100 plus half of the 5% interest that you are due to get each year.

Time 12 months (one year):  $105.0625

This the $102.50 you has after 6 months, plus another $2.50 in interest on the original $100 plus interest of $0.0625 on the $2.50 of interest you received after 6 months.  Note that if you took the $2.50 of interest after the first six months out of the bank and spent it, then you would have only $105 after a year.  The effects of compounding interest are seen only if you keep your money in the bank and earn interest on your interest.

If you increase the frequency of the compounding and keep your money in the bank… you get 105.1162, which is more than then  $105.0625 you get from just 2 interest payments a year.

4) Interest Rate Examples

Here is a table with examples of how much you would have if you put your money in the bank for one year based on different rates of compounding.  For example, if you earn 3% per year and there are payments every 6 months, that is 2 payments, so $100 put in the bank under those terms would result in a value of  $103.0225 after a year.

And here is the same table expressed as discount factors, which are the ratio of present value divided by future value:

5) Yield Basis

To more accurately compute the discount factor you would need to better determine the number of days on which you are earning interest.  For example, whether there are 28, 29, 30, or 31 days in a given month. Holidays vs. good business days and leap days (i.e., Feb 29 during a leap year) can also play a role.  Sometimes, you may need to calculate interest payments assuming actual days and sometimes you may need to calculate interest assuming you get the same payment for each month, i.e., you ignore the actual number of days in the month.   A term commonly used to describe what is known as the ‘day count’ logic is ‘Yield Basis’.  An example yield basis is 30 / 360, which means use the same time to compute interest for each month.  I.e., 30 days for 12 months makes a pretend 360 days in the year.   Another example yield basis is Actual / Actual which means use actual days.

6) MTM for a Commodity Swap

A ‘Commodity Swap’ is a trade where two counterparties agree to make payments to each other for one or more months based on the price of some commodity.  A Commodity Swap is an example of a type of trade called a ‘derivative’ because the value (i.e., the MTM) of a swap is derived (hence the term derivative) from the price of some underlying commodity.

A typical example might be where one firm agrees to pay $80 per barrel for 1000 barrels of crude oil for three months, e.g., January, February, and March to another firm.   And suppose the other firm might agree to pay the first firm the value of the crude oil per barrel for 1000 barrels.  The value per barrel to be paid would be determined at a future date.  It would need to be determined by some impartial third party, because it wouldn’t be fair to allow one firm to set the price.  A typical third party (third party just means that the organization is not one of the two parties directly involved in the swap agreement, i.e., not one of the two parties with a direct interest because they have to make payments.  The payments would be made each month and since there are three months (January, February, and March) that means 3 payments.  The work ‘payment’ is used to mean a cash flow, i.e., a payment, and it is also used to mean a receipt of cash.   The payments would typically be a few days after the price per barrel is determined, meaning finalized.  E.g., Five business days after the price determination date.

Notes:

1) This type of trade is called a ‘Fixed/Float’ or ‘Fixed for Float’ Swap, or sometimes a ‘Fixed for Float Financial Swap’.  The fixed refers to the fixed payment, in this case the payment will be $80/ barrel for 1000 barrels, or 3 payments (one per month) of $80,000.  The ‘float’ refers to the payments that are said to ‘float’, meaning that they are unknown / undetermined at the time of the original trades.

2) The time frame from this example trade is sometimes called a Jan – Mar swap (pronounced Jan to March swap or Jan through March swap) or a Q1 swap where Q1 means quarter one, meaning January to March.  Cal 2012 would mean a calendar year swap, typically with monthly payments, January to December in 2012.

3) The above example deal is entirely cash settled.  In other words, no physical commodity changes hands, i.e., no crude oil is actually delivered.

4) Typically the payments are netted out and so only one of the counterparties would pay the difference in payment, i.e., whoever owes the most.   In other words, instead of one counterparty paying $80,000 and the other paying the first $81,000… the second counterparty would just pay the first the net of $1,000 and the first party, the one who originally owned $80,000 would not have to make a payment.  This concept, known as ‘netting’ reduces the credit risk from one party to another.

A typical arrangement is for the dates for determining the price to be paid per barrel on the floating side of the swap are based on the last day of trading for the relevant contract month from the commodities exchange.  Unlike the swap in this example, the exchange traded commodity futures contract is physically settling, meaning if you buy it, you are expected to take delivery of the crude oil, unless you sell out of it first.

For Jan 2012, the contact expiration is December 19, 2011.   Note that the contract expires in the month prior to the delivery month and this is to give the market some time to sort out the logistics about who is going to take physical delivery and on what exact date (i.e., in the month of January).

So let’s look at one side of the swap, from the point of view of the party paying the fixed price.   We’ll use a negative sign with regard to the payment, to indicate the money is going out the door, i.e., negative means paying = bad and positive means receiving / getting the money = good.  By the way, it is the common practice to refer to the party paying the fixed price as the ‘buyer of the swap’ and the person receiving the fixed price payment as the ‘seller of the swap’.  The comes from the analogy that the person paying the fixed price is buying the commodity (i.e., is a buyer) and the person receiving the fixed price, which means they are paying the floating price, is the seller of the swap, because it is like they are selling the commodity (even though they are not actually delivering the physical commodity, just the financial value of the commodity).

#

Month

Side 1 Price

Side 1 Quantity

Side 1 Payment

Payment Date

Discount Factor

Discounted Payment

1

Jan-12

$80

-1000

-$80,000

27-Dec-11

0.99

-$79,200

2

Feb-12

$80

-1000

-$80,000

26-Jan-12

0.98

-$78,400

3

Mar-12

$80

-1000

-$80,000

24-Feb-12

0.97

-$77,600

So the sum of the payments, not including discounting is -$240,000, which is -$80,000 * 3.

The sum of the discounted payments is -$235,200 = -$79,200 + -($78,400) + (-$77,600)

Notes:

1) The payment dates are based on a typical payment date rule of 5 business days after the date the floating payment is determined.

2) The discount factors shown of 0.99, 9.98, and 0.97 are just example discount factors and not necessarily realistic.  Normally, you would calculate the discount factor from the current date, e.g., if the current date is June 10, 2011, to the payment date, i.e., 27-Dec-2011, 26-Jan-12 or 24-Feb-12.  What is realistic is that each payment date would get its own appropriate discount factor.

3) ‘Discounted Payment’ is the same as saying ‘the present value of the payment’

Now let’s look at the other side of the swap, i.e., the floating side.  We’ll look at the payments from the point of view of the party who is paying the fixed price.  The fixed price payer is receiving the payment that the floating side payer is paying, so we’ll treat these values as positive, which means money coming in, which is good.

 

#

Month

Side 2 Price

Side 2 Quantity

Side 2 Payment

Price Determination Date

Payment Date

Discount Factor

Discounted Payment

1

Jan-12

???

1000

???

19-Dec-11

27-Dec-11

0.99

???

2

Feb-12

???

1000

???

19-Jan-12

26-Jan-12

0.98

???

3

Mar-12

???

1000

???

17-Feb-12

24-Feb-12

0.97

???

Well… this is not so useful if we can’t come up with some estimate of the price of crude oil in the future.  Fortunately, there are ways to estimate the price.  This can be called the ‘estimated price’ or the ‘projected price’.  For this sample, we’ll estimate prices of $81 for January, $82 for February and $83 for March.

That gives us this table

#

Month

Side 2 Price

Side 2 Quantity

Side 2 Payment

Price Determination Date

Payment Date

Discount Factor

Discounted Payment

1

Jan-12

$81

1000

$81,000

19-Dec-11

27-Dec-11

0.99

$80,190

2

Feb-12

$82

1000

$82,000

19-Jan-12

26-Jan-12

0.98

$80,360

3

Mar-12

$83

1000

$83,000

17-Feb-12

24-Feb-12

0.97

$80,510

So the sum of the payments (which are really receipts) is $246,000.

The sum of the discounted payments (which are really receipts) is $241,060= $80,360 + $80,510 + $80,510

The undiscounted MTM value is: -$240,000 +  $246,000 = $6,000.

The discounted MTM, i.e., the present value of the swap is: -$235,200 + $241,060 = $5,860.

Notes:

1) The payment dates in this example are the same for the fixed side and the floating side.  This is typical for a commodity swap and it makes sense if you are going to net each payment.

2) Since the payment dates are the same, the discount factors are the same on both sides.  The discount factors may change from day to day based on changes in the time to the payment and potentially changes to interest rates.  On payment date, the discount factor would be 1.00, so payment would equal discounted payment on payment date.

3) In order to calculate the payments, we needed to know the formula for the payment (also known as the ‘payment formula’), which in this case is just quantity times prices.

 

To recap, here is an approach, which can be used generically to calculate the MTM of any type of swap:

1) Collect estimates for the prices and/or interest rates you’ll need to calculate the payments (i.e., the undiscounted payments):

2) Calculate the payments, i.e., the payments for each side of the swap.

3) Use the appropriate discount factors to get the present value of the payments (and receipts).

4) Sum all of the payments/receipts (i.e., all cash flows, positive or negative) to get the MTM

7) MTM for an Option

Calculating the MTM for an option can be more complicated than for a swap.  Various formulas have been developed to value options, each with certain assumptions.  We’ll refer to these formulas as ‘Pricing Models’, meaning that these are mathematical models used to price (meaning in this context, calculate the MTM) an option.

These models have in common that they take inputs, such as market prices, interest rates, and the time between now and the expiration date of the option.  The inputs are used in the mathematical formula to produce the output, i.e., the output is the MTM.  So there are inputs and one output.

Figure 1

We can expand the ‘inputs’ box as shown below in Figure 2.

Figure 2

The inputs to the pricing model could themselves have inputs…. as shown in Figure 3 below.

 

Figure 3

 

Upload Videos from Your Mobile Phone to YouTube

Here’s another cool and convenient way to post videos to YouTube: Use your mobile phone.

If your cell phone has a built-in video camera, you can upload videos directly from that phone without first copying them to your PC. All you have to do is set up YouTube’s mobile upload options and then email your videos to the YouTube site.

To configure YouTube for your mobile phone, click the My Account link at the top of any YouTube page. When your My Account page appears, scroll down to the Account Settings section and click the Mobile Upload Profiles link. On the next page, click the Create Mobile Profile button.

Next you’ll see the Create Mobile Upload Profile page. Supply the necessary information—the profile name, video title, whether you want the filename or date appended to the video title, a short description of the profile, whether your mobile videos should be public or private, tags for your mobile videos, a category for your videos, people you want to share them with, and how you want to be notified when the upload is complete. Click the Create Profile button, and your profile is created.

The profile you create includes the email address to which you should send your mobile videos. Typically it’s a series of numbers followed by @mms.youtube.com. Make a note of this address and enter it into your mobile phone’s address book.

To upload a video from your mobile phone, start by recording the video on your phone; then email the video to the @mms.youtube.com address. You’ll be notified via email or text message when YouTube has received the email and begun processing the video. You can then go to YouTube’s website and edit specific information about the newly uploaded video.

Post YouTube Videos to Your Own Blog

If you have your own personal blog, YouTube makes it easy to send any public YouTube video to your blog as a new blog posting. First, however, you have to tell YouTube about your blog so that it knows where to send the post.

Start by clicking the My Account link at the top of any YouTube page. On the My Account page, scroll down to the Account Settings section and click the Video Posting Settings link. When the next page appears, click the Add a Blog/Site button.

YouTube now displays the Add a Blog/Site page. Pull down the Blog Service list and select your blog host. (YouTube supports automatic posting to Blogger, Friendster, LiveJournal, Piczo, WordPress.com, and WordPress self-hosted blogs.) Now enter your blog username and password, click the Add Blog button, and you’re finished with this preliminary setup.

Once configured, it’s a snap to send any public YouTube video to your blog. Just open the video’s viewing page and click the Share link. When the Share Video panel opens, pull down the Choose a Blog list and select your blog. Enter a title for this post, and then enter any text you want to accompany the video. Click the Post to Blog button, and YouTube posts the video (and accompanying text) to your blog as a new post.

Share a YouTube Video through Email

If you like a particular YouTube video, chances are you have a friend or two who might like it, too. That’s why YouTube lets you share the videos you like—in fact, this type of video sharing is a defining feature of the whole YouTube experience.

You share YouTube videos via email. That is, YouTube lets you send your friends an email that contains a link to the video you like. When a friend receives this email, he or she can click the link in the message to go to YouTube and play the video.

When you want to share a video, go to that video’s page and click the Share link underneath the YouTube video player. This opens the Share Video pane; click the Friends link. When the next window appears, enter the email addresses of the intended recipients, separating multiple addresses with commas. Enter your name and a personal message if you want. Click the Send button, and in a few minutes your recipients will receive the message.

By the way, you can also share videos from your Favorites list. Just click the Share Video button beneath the video you want to share; then proceed to send the email as usual.

How to create a YouTube playlist?

One of the challenges of enjoying YouTube is the sheer volume of videos available. Saving videos to your Favorites list is one way to handle this volume, but even the Favorites list can get too large to be easily manageable.

For that reason, you may want to createplaylists separate from (or in addition to) your Favorites list. A YouTube playlist is simply a collection of videos, organized by whatever criteria you deem appropriate. You can play the videos from a playlist individually or as a group, just as you would the songs in a music playlist on your iPod. And, of course, YouTube lets you create multiple playlists; you can have as many as you want.

There are several ways to create a playlist and to add a video to that playlist. The most common method is to open the page for a video and click the Add to Favorites link. When the Add Video to Your Playlists pane appears, pull down the Select a Playlist list, select the playlist you want, and then click OK.

If you haven’t yet created a playlist, select New Playlist from the Add Video to Your Playlists list and then click OK. This displays the Create/Edit Playlist page; from here, you enter some specific information about the new playlist:

  • Playlist Name: The name you assign to the playlist.
  • Video Log: Check this option if you want this playlist used as the video log in your Channel Profile page.
  • Description: A short description of the contents of this playlist.
  • Tags: Optional keywords you can use to describe this playlist.
  • Privacy: Choose whether this playlist should be public (for all YouTube users to view) or private (for your viewing only).

After you’ve filled in all the blanks and options, click the Save Playlist Info button. Your playlist is now saved.

To view the playlists you’ve created, go to the YouTube home page and click the My Playlists link in the My box. This displays the Playlists page. All your playlists are listed at the left of the page; click a playlist name to see which videos are in that list.

To play an individual video in a playlist, click that video. To play all the videos in a playlist one after another, click the Play All Videos link. Or you can click the big Play button next to the playlist name.

How to flag a YouTube video for future viewing?

Here’s a familiar situation. You’re browsing the YouTube site and find a video that looks interesting, but you don’t have the time or inclination to watch it right then. Fortunately, YouTube lets you save this video in a temporary QuickList, without having to open the video page and start playback. Then, when you’re ready, you can go back to this video and watch it at your leisure.

To add a video to your QuickList, all you have to do is click the little + button at the lower-left corner of any video thumbnail. Videos stay in your QuickList for just a single web browsing session; as soon as you close your browser window, the QuickList is flushed.

To see all the videos stored in your QuickList, go to any video viewing page and look for the Unsaved Playlist panel on the right side of the page. View a single video by clicking the thumbnail, or you can play all the videos in your QuickList one after another by clicking the Play All link. To clear your QuickList, click the Clear link.

How to add Google+, Facebook Share on Sharebar Plugin for WordPress

In the process of writing up a post about a bunch of WordPress plugins that I use and recommend, I decided to write about the Sharebar plugin in isolation of the others simply because (apart from the fact that it’s awesome), by default, it excludes some important social networks that deserve inclusion.

What is sharebar?

You’ll notice that I have a hovering bar to the left hand side of this page that renders ‘share buttons’ to various social networks. It ‘hovers’ at the top of the page as you scroll down a post – meaning that it’s always in view, and it’s always offering encouragement for your readers to share. If the page is resized below 1000px (default), the vertical bar (to the left or right of your page container) disappears and a horizontal sharebar appears under the post title.

I’ve seen about a dozen variants of this plugin (mainly paid premium products) – but Sharebar is excellent, and it’s free. I’ve recently installed it on at least 5 blogs.

Installation

Install and activate Sharebar as you would any other plugin. You can download sharebar directly from WordPress.org here.

Configuration

The plugin offers a number of social share buttons by default. For each social network there are two button options: one ‘large’ button that renders when the sharebar is to the left or right of your page container, and a ‘small’ button that will be displayed under your title should your page be wider than 1000 pixels.

sharebar plugin setup

There are a number of configuration options available via the ‘Settings’ tab that enables you to customise colour and presentation.

Adding additional buttons

The author has indicated via his ‘to-do’ list that he’ll add more buttons, but you’ll always want a different combinations of buttons that are included by default. The Google +1 button, for example, is not yet an option. However, the plugin does have functionality that permits you to add additional share buttons, assuming the button code is available from the platform you wish to add.

Adding the Google +1 Button to Sharebar

Google provides four button options via its +1 webmaster page.

Installation is easy on any ‘normal’ webpage.

<!-- Place this tag in your head or just before your close body tag -->
<script type="text/javascript" src="https://apis.google.com/js/plusone.js"></script>

<!-- Place this tag where you want the +1 button to render -->
<g:plusone size="tall"></g:plusone>

If we want to install this code into a WordPress blog, the first thing you will have to do, as per Google’s instructions, is add the JavaScript to the head of your blog. You’ll have to copy this code into your theme’s functions.php file or, if you have one, into a custom function file.

function google_plus_one_integration() {
	?>
<script type="text/javascript" src="http://apis.google.com/js/plusone.js"></script>
	<?php
}
add_action('wp_head', 'google_plus_one_integration');

Now you must add Google code for both a large and small button into a textbox that’s presented in the Sharebar button configuration options.

sharebar plugin for wordpress setup Google Plus share
Configuration Options for the Google +1 button

Note that I’ve used the tall and small options. Once updated, the Plus One button will be available for inclusion in the sharebar.

Adding the LinkedIn Share Button to Sharebar

LinkedIn also have a share button that enables readers to post information to their LinkedIn profile. As with the Google Plus button, it’s easily integrated into Sharebar. Navigate your way to the Sharebar options (under Settings) and click “Add New Button”.

For the small button you should use code for the horizontal count:

<script type="text/javascript" src="http://platform.linkedin.com/in.js"></script><script type="in/share" data-counter="right"></script>

For the big button – displayed when the sharebar is rendered to the right or left of the page – you’ll need to render the Vertical Count button:

<script type="text/javascript" src="http://platform.linkedin.com/in.js"></script><script type="in/share" data-counter="top"></script>

Your results will look like this:

sharebar plugin for wordpress setup facebook share

LinkedIn Button options

Alternative Facebook Share Button

The clever chaps at awe.sm have built an alternative share button for Facebook for those that want a button that looks a little different. It’s my preferred option because the native FB button tends to cause some formatting problems; it’s also highly configurable and integrates well with other services (such as Google Analytics).

For the big button, add:

<script src="http://widgets.fbshare.me/files/fbshare.js"></script>

For the small button, add:

<script>var fbShare = {
 size: 'small',
 }</script>
<script src="http://widgets.fbshare.me/files/fbshare.js"></script>

You can see the results of the alternative FB share button on the sharebar to the left of this page.